Table of contents

This website is designed as a book with each art collection being a chapter. It begins with the most recent, so you are exploring a book in reverse – from what is typically the end is now the beginning. And what typically is printed and bound without pages added, is now an ongoing living entity. Chapters are continuously added to the front as I continue to live and create.

 

You also have the option to download the entire book here (updated July 2022).

A series of paintings which subtly reflect upon the ways that beliefs in church or state alter our perspectives.

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Alternative methodologies for constructing our homes and lives.

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Bodies of Water traces part of the water cycle from icy lakes replenished by snowy mountain runoff to streams as they become rivers and the rivers as they flow out to sea.

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An exploration of the power of language and of how language belongs to people in power.

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Flex. The word describes a bodily gesture—the contraction of muscles or the bending of a joint. Colloquially, it also describes a display of dominance, a usage directly linked to the power of physical might.

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This series of works aims at fostering a greater awareness of ourselves and each other, being awake to what is happening around us above what we are told.

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Italy is famous for the rich minerals of its soil, which have been used to pigment works of art for hundreds of years. I draw upon this history of color in small paintings of Venetian terrazzo.

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A work about the fundamental sociality of speaking and hearing, even when the person you are addressing is yourself.

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A collection of photographs and NFTs that draw on art historical precedents for using fruits and vegetables as memento mori.

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The title of the collection is an invocation of the common Italian saying, used to prompt another person to speak: “Dimmi Amore,” “tell me, my love.”

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Building foundations and encouraging community growth through a ceramics school, production studio, and residency program.

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Poked and prodded out of sameness, these works are forced to stand—if a little clumsily—on their own feet.

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I know people who look almost religiously to the tarot deck for wisdom. I have never been that person, but I do see the cards—like any form of projection—as a means of clarifying subconscious feelings.

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I often felt alienated by my family and their different ideas about who I should be and how I should act. Sometimes, I would imagine the story of my birth and childhood as though I really were some otherworldly creature, made of fundamentally different stuff.

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Reinterpreting mountainous landscapes as alien topographies, I wonder if this is also what drew my grandfather Onorino to the Alps— a love not for the familiar but for the unknown.

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Reflect on the cruel symmetry of using the image of a puppet to attempt to control the masses—enslaving them by telling them that they will be freed from bondage.

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Coronavirus has caused fear and loss. But it has also prompted us to reflect upon the importance of human life, cultural connection, and collective memory. This moment, which mirrors those that have come before, offers an opportunity for a contemporary form of humanism and social rebirth.

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Mirroring considers the origins of international trade, charting its history from the Silk Road that connected the West with the Middle East and Asia, to the present day when cardboard boxes deliver products from halfway around the world.

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This series of works challenge the viewer to acknowledge the parity between human and animal beings.

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Coffee—the drink that enabled and continues to perpetuate a homogenized and capitalist culture.

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Attempts to stop the march of time.

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This performance score and video work documents my process of unlearning years of internalized insults, of recognizing my own power and resolving that I won’t let anyone take it away.

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As a child, I loved to draw Mickey Mouse, to chart his simple, interlacing geometries in thin pencil lines.

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For years, the market has instrumentalized the insecurities of men and women alike, preying on the desire to achieve some unattainable ideal.

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“And the weight in my stomach feels like a stone—a stone l’ve been trying to chisel at for years now, to remove from my body so I can finally, maybe for the first time since I was a child, take a deep full breath and feel freedom.”

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Based on research that I conducted while visiting Sardinia in August 2020, this body of work comprises photographs and journal entries made during my time there, as well as a series of sculptures derived from the little fish that gave the island its name.

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These textual works are about the dialogic space of affection, which takes shape not only in verbal endearments but also in hearing another when they speak.

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Art can be a conduit for pure feeling and spiritual symbolism, while also engaging in a Modernist revision of contemporary life.

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As the workers began to see that their struggle was not just with the farmers, but with the government as well, “Bella ciao” expanded in use becoming—between 1943 and 1945—a rallying cry for the anti-fascist resistance.

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The idea of family holds a strange pressure for me—the assumption that you share interests, beliefs, and ambitions, simply because you share genetic code or, in timeworn parlance, “blood.”

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Through correspondences between positive shapes and negative voids, this collection metaphorically explores my personal search for psychological well being.

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Boredom, the “dream bird that hatches the egg of experience.”

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Copper Nail and the Rondine looks at humankind’s relationship to nature through the lens of copper, weaving a web of material confusions that demonstrate our growing alienation from the earth.

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Drawing on memories of the Venetian stories that my grandparents told me as I grew up, this collection of sculptures collide elements of the narratives as if trying—and failing—to recreate the same arc.

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I reflect upon my body’s struggle with metal toxicity and my efforts to rebuild the ruin that I had become.

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Peering at Faint Lights in the Distance materializes a series of visions that I had in 2014 under the influence of ayahuasca, visions which collided different parts of my life and revealed linkages that had previously been obscure.

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I began this series of paintings after I started meditating, reflecting upon the way that this practice prompted me to explore my own mind as one would an architecture.

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In 2013, several friends and family members passed away in quick succession. These events prompted me to consider death, the fragility of life, and the living conditions of those who are old or in hospice.

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